Happy Birthday, Lewis Carroll!

Lewis Carroll's Gift, of Words is shared enthusiastically by parents and teachers, and has been the subject of a body of  University Level Research to Include Math,  Philosophy, Creative Writing, Film Studies and Psychology. Mr. Carroll Infused Animal Characters, Domestic, Wild - and Imagined in His Stories and Poems. His Use of Animal Imagery Can be Seen, Throughout His Work.

 

 This enchanting image courtesy of children's book illustrator, Sandra Dieckmann.

This enchanting image courtesy of children's book illustrator, Sandra Dieckmann.

A Strange Wild Song

He thought he saw an Elephant
That practised on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A letter from his wife.
"At length I realize," he said,
"The bitterness of life!"

He thought he saw a Buffalo
Upon the chimney-piece:
He looked again, and found it was
His Sister's Husband's Niece.
"Unless you leave this house," he said,
"I'll send for the police!"

he thought he saw a Rattlesnake
That questioned him in Greek:
He looked again, and found it was
The Middle of Next Week.
"The one thing I regret," he said,
"Is that it cannot speak!"

He thought he saw a Banker's Clerk
Descending from the bus:
He looked again, and found it was
A Hippopotamus.
"If this should stay to dine," he said,
"There won't be much for us!"

He thought he saw a Kangaroo
That worked a Coffee-mill:
He looked again, and found it was
A Vegetable-Pill.
"Were I to swallow this," he said,
"I should be very ill!"

He thought he saw a Coach-and-Four
That stood beside his bed:
He looked again, and found it was
A Bear without a Head.
"Poor thing," he said, "poor silly thing!
It's waiting to be fed!" 

Lewis Carroll